Dec 2013 – Apr 2018

Nutrition Advocacy

Global

Country

Multiple countries – Global

To support and build a policy, political and financial environment for the effective delivery of nutrition interventions to meet Nutrition for Growth targets.

$12,903,248 Multi-Year Grant Value

Evaluators

Other funders

  • Tata Trusts -

  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation -

  • The World Bank

This investment builds on the success of Nutrition for Growth and an earlier advocacy investment, continuing to apply pressure on donor and Southern governments to deliver on their commitments, and advancing effective accountability mechanisms.  We are helping to design and fund effective accountability tools - at the global and country level - to drive progress through transparent data. This will hold donors and governments to account. 

CIFF’s approach supports key partners at the global level, as well as specifically in Africa and Asia, to conduct evidence-based advocacy for effective policy and fiscal changes. 

Impact

Over the past five years, developing countries and the development community have started to recognise nutrition as a cross-cutting development priority, including the 2025 World Health Assembly goals and the Nutrition for Growth Summit.  In response to this window of opportunity to transform the global response to under-nutrition, CIFF has developed a portfolio of nutrition advocacy investments.

To achieve the 2025 World Health Assembly targets, an enabling environment for rapid programme scale-up is required. Action to address undernutrition must become politically salient, and an inevitable change. Advocacy plays a key role in sustaining the political will needed to protect and increase nutrition resources at a national level.

Results so far include: 

  • The Global Nutrition Report, which has established itself as a key accountability tool tracking the global nutrition landscape, was published – 120 countries now report (from a baseline of 94 in 2015) and 27 countries have committed to track nutrition expenditures
  • New political and financial nutrition commitments have been made,  including $24 million recommended over and above the US President’s budget proposal by Congress in the US, and €25 million over and above their 2013 Nutrition for Growth commitment in the Netherlands 
  • Analysis to determine what it will cost to reach the 2025 World Health Assembly Targets on nutrition, was launched at the 2016 World Bank Spring Meeting
  • Work targeting the World Bank’s nutrition work, alongside high-level engagement by Results/ACTION contributed to increased momentum at the World Bank to tackle stunting
  • Work at the country level to track nutrition expenditures has begun in Rajasthan, Ethiopia and Bangladesh